Apologizing

Remember the time your life was changed because you doubted your ability, and someone you trusted convinced you that you could do it? 

Do you remember the healing effect that took place when somebody who hurt you deeply said those magic words?  “I was wrong” or “I’m sorry” changed everything in an instant.

How about the time somebody saw something in you that you couldn’t see in yourself – something unique, special, gifted – and pointed it out?

All of these are examples of the six most powerful things you can say to someone.

You and I wouldn’t have to talk very long to agree that words have power.  The old proverb still rings true that “death and life are in the power of the tongue” (Proverbs 18:21).  If that’s true, then doesn’t it make sense that we have the power to intentionally choose life with our words?

I’ve made my living with words for a long time.  And yes, I have seen up close and personal how words can crush someone’s spirit, destroy relationships, and create a slow (or quick) march to death.  But I have also been on both sides of conversations where words gave life, strength, renewed passion and courage.

There are all kinds of ways to encourage, inform, and give new vision.  But six expressions stand apart, in a league of their own.  If you want to take your words to the next stratosphere, try one or all of these six in your relationships: [click to continue…]

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poutingOne of our inside family jokes has to do with a certain child of ours who had the hardest time simply apologizing or admitting she was wrong.

(This same child, as a two-year-old, used to wear a t-shirt with the picture of a well-known TV character who had a similar problem.  The most he could ever do was say, in his coolness, “I was wr-r-r-r-r.”  I wonder if the t-shirt rubbed off somehow.)

Anyway, the conversations would go something like this:

“You need to tell her/him you’re sorry.”

“But I didn’t mean to.”

“It doesn’t matter – you did it.  Say you’re sorry.”

“But I didn’t mean to.”

“But you did it.”

“It’s not my fault.”

“SAY IT!”

“I DIDN’T MEAN TO!”

Where Could She POSSIBLY Learn Something Like That?

To this day, we haven’t really understood what a simple apology symbolized to this child, but she wasn’t buyin’.  But let’s face it.  We all come by our reluctance to admit fault pretty honestly.  [click to continue…]

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